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Charlotte Mecklenburg Library March 2021 Book Recommendations

New Books for Spring

By Charlotte Mecklenburg Library March 13, 2021

Spring into reading with Charlotte Mecklenburg Library! We’re excited to announce we re-opened our doors to the public on March 1, 2021, with limited, Level 2 services in all branches. What does that mean for you? Customers now have the chance to browse their own materials, pick up materials holds, complete self-checkout, make returns to branches during open hours and, of course, access the same great programs online. Although the quarantine continues with looser restrictions, what one thing do we suggest to help pass the time? Keep reading! 

This month, we provide four fresh titles for different age groups in your home to check out. Don’t forget to visit cmlibrary.org to learn about the virtual programs and digital resources you can access safely from the comfort of home. Happy reading! 



 

Toddler/Preschool:  

 Help Wanted, Must Love Books by Janet Sumner Johnson

Shailey loves bedtime, especially reading with her dad. But her dad starts a new job, and it gets in the way of their bedtime routine. Shailey puts a plan in action! She fires her dad, posts a Help Wanted sign, and starts interviews immediately. She is thrilled when her favorite characters from fairytales line up to apply. But Sleeping Beauty can't stay awake, the Gingerbread Man steals her book, and Snow White brings along her whole team. Shailey is running out of options. Is bedtime ruined forever?

School Age:  

 Clues to the Universe by Christina Li

 The only thing Rosalind Ling Geraghty loves more than watching NASA launches with her dad is building rockets with him. When he dies unexpectedly, all Ro has left of him is an unfinished model rocket they had been working on together. Benjamin Burns doesn't like science, but he can't get enough of Spacebound, a popular comic book series. When he finds a sketch that suggests that his dad created the comics, he's thrilled. Too bad his dad walked out years ago, and Benji has no way to contact him. Though Ro and Benji were only supposed to be science class partners, the pair become unlikely friends: Benji helps Ro finish her rocket, and Ro figures out a way to reunite Benji and his dad. But Benji hesitates, which infuriates Ro. Doesn't he realize how much Ro wishes she could be in his place? As the two-face bullying, grief, and their own differences, Benji and Ro must try to piece together clues to some of the biggest questions in the universe.


Teen:  

Super Fake Love Song by David Yoon

When self-proclaimed nerd Sunny Dae meets Cirrus Soh, she mistakes Sunny's older brother Gray's bedroom, with its electric guitars and rock posters, for Sunny's own. He sort of, kind of, accidentally winds up telling her he's the frontman of a rock band. Now Sunny is knee-deep in the lie and begs his best friends into forming a fake band with him. When Cirrus asks to see them play, people start noticing him in the hallways. Now Sunny is going to football games and parties, feeling more confident, falling in love-- and having fun. As his lies begin to catch up, was it all worth it?

Parenting:  

 Fourteen Talks by Age Fourteen: The Essential Conversations You Need to Have with Your Kids Before They Start High School by Michelle Icard

Trying to convince a middle schooler to listen to you can be exasperating. Indeed, it can feel like the best option is not to talk! But keeping kids safe--and prepared for all the times when you can't be the angel on their shoulder--is about having the right conversations at the right time. From a brain growth and emotional readiness perspective, there is no better time for this than their tween years, right up to when they enter high school.

Distilling Michelle Icard's decades of experience working with families, Fourteen Talks by Age Fourteen focuses on big, thorny topics such as friendship, sexuality, impulsivity, and technology, as well as unexpected conversations about creativity, hygiene, money, privilege, and contributing to the family. Icard outlines a simple, memorable, and family-tested formula for the best approach to these essential talks, the BRIEF Model: B egin peacefully, R elate to your child, I nterview to collect information, E cho what you're hearing, and give F eedback. With wit and compassion, she also helps you get over the most common hurdles in talking to tweens.